Salmon Confidential April 10, 2013

“Salmon Confidential”

Alexandra Morton and Filmmaker Twyla Roscovich will be attending.

Follow biologist Alexandra Morton as she unravels the mysteries of B.C.’s declining salmon stocks using some of the world’s top fish labs.  What she uncovers should shock anyone who cares about the future of salmon and all that depends on them. This 70 minute film documents Morton’s long and dedicated journey as she attempts to overcome roadblocks thrown up by government agencies and bring critical information to the public in time to save B.C.’s wild salmon.  Learn about how fish farms are changing our coastal ecology, grassroots science-based activism and the shocking inner workings of government agencies tasked with overseeing our fish and the safety of our food supply.

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Annual Farming and Gardening Gala – March 6, 2013

                  Annual

Farming and Gardening Gala

Co-sponsored with Sooke Food CHI

Stories from Women Farmers, Old and New
Featuring:

- “Outstanding in Her field” – a film by and about women in sustainable agriculture produced in the 1990′s by the South Island Organic Producers Association, including Sooke’s Mary Alice Johnson of ALM Farms. This film had the aim “to inspire others to involve themselves in sustainable agriculture on any scale – to join us in this lifestyle that nurtures the ecosystem, our families and our communities and ourselves”.  An aim that has been realized in most remarkable ways.

-  Several short film clips featuring women farmers in Sooke, East Sooke and Metchosin discussing farming in 2013 as a preview to the planned “Outstanding in Her Field, the Sequel”.

-  A post screening panel of local farmers will celebrate the experience and unique contributions of women in sustainable agriculture, including such issues as farming with small children, the special roles of husbands of women farmers, access to farm land, the physical demands of farming and exploring why it is that so many new farmers are women.

- Booths in the foyer with a wonderful array of locally grown and made products, produce and seeds for sale plus information on gardening and farming in the community.

- Tea and goodies (by donation) made by the Culinary Arts students at Edward Milne High School featuring local ingredients.

- Gift baskets to give away.

Doors open at 6:45; film at 7:30

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Possibility – February 13, 2013

“Possibility”


A collection of short film clips from around the world that focus on creating a sustainable, vibrant, healthy, cooperative and merry community.  Featuring  the following titles from nextworldtv.com: “Bikes, Trees, Cafes”, “Local Share”, “First Permaculture Eco Village”, “50 Machines Needed For Life” ,  “Generation Waking Up”,  Mushrooms Break Down Toxic Waste”, “Straw Bale Homes”, “Worker Cooperatives”, “Local Living Economy” and “Fantastic Fungi”.

Post screening presentations from:

Members of The Village Farm, an ecovillage and farming cooperative in the making on 150 acres of farmland on Helgeson Road in Sooke (villagefarmblog.wordpress.com/)

The Harbourside Senior Co-Housing project planned for the current Sooke Ocean Resort property; a warm-up for their information session at the site on Feb. 16th.

Frederique Philip, owner of Sooke Harbour House, discussing “the boatification of Sooke”, a grass roots movement  that is ready to make a debut and gather ideas and people who are interested in beautifying the town of Sooke.

 

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Play Again & Consuming Kids – January 9, 2013

“Play Again” and “Consuming Kids”

Play Again explores the consequences of a childhood removed from nature.  This moving and humorous documentary follows six teenagers as they unplug and go on their first wilderness adventure – no electricity, no cell phone coverage, no virtual reality.  Research shows that a lack of connection with nature leads to less creativity and less self-sufficiency. Through the voices of the children as well as those of journalist Richard Louv, author of “Last Child In the Woods”, sociologist Juliet Schor, environmental writer Bill McGibben, educators Diana Levin and Nancy Carlsson-Paige, neuroscientist Gary Small and geneticist David Suzuki, this film encourages action for a sustainable future.

Consuming Kids: The Commercialization of Childhood throws some desperately needed light on the explosive growth of consumer marketing to children, showing how youth marketers have used the latest advances in psychology, anthropology and neuroscience to transform North American children into one of the most powerful and profitable consumer demographics in the world.  This film raises urgent questions about the ethics of children’s marketing and its impact on the health and well-being of kids.

Post screening discussion on Sooke School District 62′s pilot Nature Kindergarten with Frances Krusekopf and Roberta Kubik of SD 62.  Frances Krusekopf, teacher and school administrator, has worked as an educator for fifteen years in Mongolia, Texas and most recently the Sooke School District.  Inspired by the experience of having her son participate in a Waldkindergarten in Germany, she began to collaborate with Dr. Enid Elliot and a dynamic team of educators and passionate community members to develop a Nature Kindergarten pilot at Sangster Elementary in Colwood, B.C.  Roberta Kubik is Sooke School District Assistant Superintendent and former principal at Edward Milne Community School in Sooke.

See Trailer:

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Genetic Roulette - December 12, 2012

Post screening discussion with Thierry Vrain.

A recently released film by Jeffrey M. Smith, author of “Seeds Of Deception”, that exposes new evidence that genetically engineered (GE) foods are a major contributor to rising disease rates, especially among children.  Gastrointestinal disorders, inflammatory diseases, allergies and infertility are just some of the problems implicated in humans, pets, livestock and lab animals that eat genetically modified organisms (GMOs). 

In exposing the bullying and deceit of the biotech industry, Jeffrey Smith’s mesmerizing film shines a bright light of hope that we can reclaim our health and our food systems.  Meticulously documented, thoroughly comprehensive and rivetingly presented.”  –   John Robbins, author of Diet For A New America.

This sometimes shocking film that includes shopping suggestions for a non-GE diet, may help you protect your family, change your diet and accelerate the consumer tipping point against GMO’s.

Thierry Vrain was born and raised in Paris, France.  He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in biology in France and his PhD in the U.S.  He has had a long career as a research scientist for the Canadian government in Quebec and B.C.  About 10 years ago, after 35 years of research and teaching soil biology and molecular biology – what he now calls “Chemical Agriculture”, he decided to retire young and reinvent life.  He and his partner, herbalist Chanchal Cabrera operate Innisfree Farm in Royston in the Comox Valley where they farm, and hold workshops and classes in organic farming, medicinal herbalism and Horticulture Therapy.  Thierry is a passionate speaker about organic gardening, from soil health to the devastating effects of GMO’s.  He has an in-depth understanding of global agricultural research, including genetic engineering, and can provide information and answer questions on aspects of this topic that moviegoers are not likely to find out about elsewhere.

As has been our tradition for the past few years, our December screening will offer moviegoers a chance to contribute to ICON, International Childrens’ Outreach Network.  This is the small organization that Sooke resident Hum (Eric Anderson) offers a month of his time for in Africa every January.  Their mandate is to seek out and transport children who require surgeries, mostly for birth defects and accidents, to clinics where they can be treated by doctors who also volunteer their services. These children and their families are otherwise unable to afford such basic life-saving and altering treatments that we, in Canada, take for granted.

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