Season Finale: “All the Time in the World” May 13, 2015

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A family of five (mom, dad, kids 10, 8 and 4) leave their comfortable life in Dawson City to spend 9 months in a small log cabin with no running water, electricity, road access, internet or even clocks and watches.

Filmmaker Suzanne Crocker (the mom), who switched careers from rural family physician to filmmaker explains:  “This is not a survival in the wilderness documentary nor is it a documentary about living off the grid.  All the Time in the World is about opening possibilities in the fabric of our lives.”

What many of us have suspected is true:  if we remove ourselves from the constraints of time and our gadgets we give space for life to unfold with its inherent creativity and sense of wonder.  This film is a glimpse of what is possible when we re-unite with nature and the flow of life around us.

Definitely an all-ages film.  Teens especially encouraged.  “All the Time in the World” just won the “Best Picture” as chosen by a youth jury ages 13-19 at the Reel 2 Real International Film Festival for Youth in Vancouver.

In fact, it has won “Audience Pick Best Documentary” awards in film festivals all over the world, including a recent one at an International Film Festival in Mexico.

This film will not be in the film library at A Sea of Bloom after the screening, since, being a first-run film, it must be returned to the filmmaker.

“All the Time in the World is near perfection.  The images cast a spell and so does the story.” – Ken Eisner, The Georgia Strait April 2015

“5/5 stars – timely and inspiring” – Michael Reid, Times Colonist

“May be my favourite out of literally hundreds of films across the years.” – Chuck Jaffe, The Union

“May be mine, too” – Jo Phillips, Awareness Film Night



In the last Awareness Film Night of the year, we watched a film by Suzanne Crocker, starring her very own family in an experimental unplugging-getaway from the Rat Race. The beautiful and touching film details the delights and slowness of something many of us who are removed from take for granted: living within the embrace of Nature. Their 9 month adventure and meditation on self-reliance and stillness, serves to calm the rapid fire information and technological blitzkrieg that faces all of us in the civilized world.

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Farm and Film Gala “Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story” April 8th

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Co-presented with Sooke Food CHI

In “Just Eat It:  A Food Waste Story” Vancouver Waste Whittlers Jen and Grant, whom we met in January’s screening of “The Clean Bin Project”, return with another no waste-producing/no money-spending vow:  to only consume food that is considered “waste” for 6 months.  Did you say “yuck”?  So did they when they first came up with the idea.  And, yes, they did do some dumpster-diving.  But you will be surprised at the caliber of food they lived on.  Their eye-opening and entertaining adventures are interspersed with enlightening information from experts on the topic of wasted food: dumped, saved, ridiculously defined, feared and re-used in creative ways.  This film brings together farmers, retailers, inspiring food waste-saving organizations and consumers to the table.  www.foodwastemovie.com

The evening will feature tables in the theatre foyer with local products, seeds and produce for sale as well as information on gardening, farming, managing food waste and food security initiatives in our region.  There will be tea and goodies made by the EMCS Culinary Arts class (by donation) and fabulous gift baskets filled with items from the vendors.

Post-screening speakers will speak briefly and then answer questions from the audience.  Frederique Philip, owner of Sooke Harbour House and Dave Patterson, produce manager at Western Foods will discuss how their respective businesses deal with food waste and Steve Unger, farmer and chairman of Zero Waste Sooke will talk about the economic and environmental impacts of waste leaving Sooke and the mandate of Zero Waste Sooke.

 

Doors open at 6:45; film is at 7:30; discussion until 9:30

Post-film discussion:

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The Price We Pay March 4, 2015

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Over one-half of the world’s stock of money is beyond reach of public treasuries, placing the tax burden on the middle class and the poor.  This smart, eye-opening, incendiary film by Canadian filmmaker Harold Crooks (“The Corporation”; “Surviving Progress”) examines the dark history and present-day reality of big business tax avoidance which has seen multinationals deprive governments of trillions of dollars of tax revenues by stashing their profits in offshore havens; money that could be well-spent on providing services for the citizens of the countries they operate in.  Featuring interviews with leading economists (including Thomas Piketty), tax justice campaigners and former finance and technology industry insiders juxtaposed with outrageous footage of CEOs trying to defend their big name corporations when under questioning for tax evasion by British parliamentarians.

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DamNation February 11, 2015

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Co-presented with Sierra Club of B.C.

This film is from the U.S. where there is a change in the national attitude towards the damming of rivers from pride in big dams as engineering wonders to the growing awareness that the future is bound to the life and health of rivers.  Dams are coming down in the U.S. and several dammed rivers and their ecosystems are being restored to their natural states.

Not so in B.C. where the provincial government has just approved creation of the Site C dam on the Peace River which will flood over 100 kilometers of prime farmland found on the river valley bottomland, sever the Yellowstone to Yukon wildlife corridor and flood First Nations heritage sites.

Post-screening discussion will be lead by Ana Simeon, Peace Valley campaigner from Sierra Club of B.C.

 

 

 

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The Clean Bin Project – January 14, 2015

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Co-sponsored with Transition Sooke.

Is it possible to live completely waste free for a year?  In this award-winning documentary, partners Jen and Grant go head to head in a light-hearted competition to see who can swear off consumerism and produce the least garbage.  Set in Vancouver, this film is a call to action that speaks to crowds of all ages.

Before the film in the theatre foyer there will be a chance to visit the Free Store Table (bring a functional item you no longer need….maybe a Christmas gift that didn’t quite resonate with you…….. and take away something that you do; see below for guidelines) and the Transition Sooke table where there will be a small display of items that can replace some of the plastic in our lives such as reusable produce bags, can and bowl toppers, and cleaning sponges.

Once in the theatre, the evening will start with a short video tour (done by Jen and Grant) of the Gibsons Recycling Depot and a talk by Buddy Boyd, from Zero Waste Canada and co-founder of the Gibsons depot.

After the screening of “The Clean Bin Project”, there will be a discussion led by Transition Sooke’s Tony St. Pierre focusing on ideas for reducing the garbage footprint in the Sooke and Juan de Fuca Districts attended by Sooke Mayor Maja Tait and several owners of local businesses who have taken steps to reduce their garbage footprint.  We will learn about Transition Sooke’s initiatives to reduce the use of plastic bags and will be launching a Zero Waste Committee to hopefully work with our elected and appointed officials on making our local garbage disposal areas less of a “dump” and more recycle and re-use friendly.

The evening is expected to go a little longer than usual, likely until 9:30

Here are some guidelines for the free store table:

1. Items should be cleaned prior.  2. Items should be useful/functional and/or art rather than knick knacks.  3. A max of 3 items for the table; unlimited takeaway.  4. No clothing unless it is a special item (handmade, vintage, brand new, etc.).  5.  If you have items too large to be carried away, bring a photo and/or description and contact info for the table.

 

 

 

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