March 8, 2017 Toad People

             A Story of Hope.  B.C. currently has no law to protect endangered species.  But everywhere in the province local communities are taking action to stand up for species at risk – western toads, barn owls, mountain caribou, Oregon spotted frogs and more.  For the last 4 years co-directors Mike McKinlay and Isabelle Groc have documented people, families and communities across B.C. who have come together to take action to save the wildlife in their backyard.  These stories have been brought together in the Wilderness Committee’s inspiring film “Toad People”.

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POSTPONED TO February 15, 2017 “Vaxxed: From CoverUp to Catastrophe”

In 2013 U.S. biologist Dr. Brian Hooker received a phone call from a Senior Scientist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Dr. William Thompson.  Dr. Thompson had led the agency’s study done in 2004 on Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccine and its possible link to autism. In that phone call Dr. Thompson confessed that crucial data revealing a causal relationship between the MMR vaccine and autism had been omitted in the final report.

Dr. Hooker enlisted the help of Dr. Andrew Wakefield, the British gastroenterologist falsely accused of starting the “anti-vaxx” movement when he reported in 1998 that the MMR vaccine has a possible link with autism.  This is not an anti-vaccination film.  In fact Dr. Wakefield notes in the film that he still recommends children receive MMR vaccines, but in single doses rather than all at once.  In his ongoing effort to advocate for children’s health, Wakefield has directed this 2016 documentary examining the evidence behind an appalling cover-up.

This 90 minute film features interviews with pharmaceutical insiders, doctors, politicians and parents of vaccine-injured children in addition to the confidential data provided by the whistleblower, Dr. Thompson.

There will be a post screening discussion and Q&A with Dr. Anke Zimmermann, a Naturopathic Physician from Victoria who has 25 years experience working with natural treatments for autism, ADHD and other behavioural and developmental disorders with a special interest in vaccine injuries.

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January 11, 2017 “An Evening With Andrew Nikiforuk” plus “A Last Stand for Lelu”

           

      Co-sponsored with Transition Sooke

Author and journalist Andrew Nikiforuk has been writing about the oil and gas industry for over 2 decades.  His articles have appeared in a variety of Canadian publications, including The Walrus, Mac Leans, Canadian Business, Georgia Straight, Equinox, Chatelaine, and Harrowsmith. A list of the books he has written includes “Energy of Slaves”, “Empire of the Beetle”, “The Tar Sands” and his latest, “Slick Water:  Fracking and One Insider’s Stand Against the World’s Most Powerful Industry”.  Formerly based in Calgary, Andrew Nikiforuk now lives on Vancouver Island. He is a frequent contributor to B.C.’s online news site thetyee.ca. Here is a sampling of his articles:

www.thetyee.ca/Opinion/2016/10/21/Canadian-Pipeline-Harsh-Truths/

www.thetyee.ca/Opinion/2016/11/10/BC-LNG-Fraud/

“A Last Stand for Lelu” is a half hour documentary about Lelu Island, the site of the proposed LNG plant and shipping berth near Prince Rupert.  Lelu Island is in the middle of Flora Banks, the most important juvenile fish habitat for the entire Skeena River system, some of the most important salmon habitat in Canada. It is also on the traditional territory of the Lax Kw’alaams First Nations, who voted 100% “NO” for this project, refused a $1 billion offer from Malaysian state oil firm Petronas to put the LNG terminal on Lelu Island, only to see it being given a go-ahead by the BC provincial government.  The film was produced and directed by Farhan Umedaly (VoVo Productions) and Tamo Campos (Beyond Boarding).

We will screen the film at 7:00 and then give the stage over to Andrew.

 

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December 14, 2016 “For the Love of Music”

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A collaboration between Awareness Film Night, the Sooke Philharmonic Society and Harmony Project Sooke

The evening will be a benefit for the Harmony Project and will feature 3 short films followed by live music and mulled cider and seasonal goodies in the theatre foyer.

The original Harmony Project was founded L.A. by Dr. Margaret Martin who saw the great need and potential benefit of providing free musical education to children in the inner city neighborhoods of L.A.

Several years ago Maestro Norman Nelson of the Sooke Philharmonic Orchestra visited HP in L.A. and came away inspired to bring a similar program to Sooke. Although the context in inner city L.A. of violent gangs and extreme poverty is quite different from our context here in tranquil and relatively well-off Sooke, both communities share the need of more access to musical education, especially as school districts have been forced to cutback programs in the Arts.

The evening will begin with performances by The Harmony Project’s Beginning Strings and Drumline classes. We will then screen the recently produced half hour documentary “For the Love of Music”, described as “an intimate look at the celebrated Sooke Philharmonic Orchestra…and the orchestra’s relevance within this small West Coast town”.  That will be followed by several short films about the Harmony Project, its history, successes and some research into the benefits of learning to play a musical instrument.

Filmgoers are then invited to enjoy live music by members of  the SPO in the theatre foyer plus refreshments at a concession offering coffee, mulled cider, baked goodies and popcorn.  The evening will end when the mingling, music and mulled cider are finished.

Proceeds from the event and concessions will go towards the work of HPS and SPO to continue promoting and producing music in our community.

 

 

 

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Nov. 9th “What’s Up With Site C?”

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The proposed Site C dam that would flood B.C.’s beautiful Peace River Valley is slowly going ahead despite the fact that it will drown 12,000 hectares of valuable farming land, key North American wildlife habitats including a UNESCO Wildlife Reserve in Alberta and many First Nations traditional hunting and fishing areas and has been shown to be unnecessary for electricity needs now or in the foreseeable future by no less than a Joint Federal and Provincial Review Panel.

The creation of the Site C dam would be a very expensive project with next to no returns on investment given the high cost of production and low projected demand for the electricity it would produce.  This would leave B.C. Hydro customers (you and me) on the hook for the (at least) 9 billion that this project will cost.

This evening will feature the film “Peace Out” followed by a Q & A with our MLA and Provincial NDP leader John Horgan and Steve Gray, a NoSiteC campaigner from Metchosin who participated on this summer’s Rolling Justice Bus Tour to the Peace River Valley.

“Peace Out” is a thought-provoking and beautifully made documentary by Charles Wilkinson (“Haida Gwaii: On the Edge of the World”) that takes the viewer from the Peace River Valley to the Alberta tar sands to Vancouver boardrooms to explore deeper causes of environmental exploitation.

Bring your questions for the Q&A.  Here are some to get you started: Where do we stand today? What is the reality and what are the myths about Site C? How feasible are more sustainable/less destructive sources of power? What has been done to date?  What would it look like if we were to halt the whole thing?

If we go past 9:00, so be it.

 

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22nd Season Premier: “Requiem for the American Dream” October 12, 2016

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If the upcoming U.S. election is leaving you frustrated and longing for a voice of sanity amidst the political hype, look no further than the inimitable Noam Chomsky.  “Requiem for the American Dream” is a clear-eyed outline of how and why American idealism has been sabotaged.  Filmed over 4 years, these interviews with Noam Chomsky are profoundly personal and thought-provoking.

“A sobering vision of a society in an accelerated decline….this well-paced film spotlights a man who, now 87, seems at the height of his intellectual powers”

– New York Times (Critics’ Pick)

“A provocative X-ray of current American political realities….the vicious cycle of wealth influencing power and therefore influencing legislation is effectively illustrated in a series of episodic, easily digestible vignettes”

– rogerebert.com

 

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Season Finale: Haida Gwaii: On the Edge of the World May 11, 2016

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B.C. filmmaker Charles Wilkinson’s (“Peace Out”; “Oil Sands Karaoke”) award-winning 2015 documentary is set on pristine Haida Gwaii.  It shows how the distinct world view of the 14,000 year old indigenous society is co-mingling with an influx of progressive, modern urbanites to create a sustainable world that well may survive the formidable challenges of the 21st century.

From a woman who constructs solar power installations to people doing sustainable logging and farming and traditional fishing to legendary resolute Haida warriors, all of the remarkable people in this film are determined to keep their island home the beautiful paradise that it is.  Haida Hereditary Chief Allan Wilson observes:  “People from other countries are coming here to see what we’re doing….how do you fight your government and corporations over this land?  How do you fight over the water?  How come your Nation is so small and yet you’re able to do all of these things?”

Gorgeous footage and cogent tales of practical living and activism make “Haida Gwaii: On the Edge of the World” an inspiring and hopeful film.

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Farm and Film Gala April 13, 2016

 

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There will be vendors of farm produce and products, food, seeds and plants as well as tables with information from local farm and food related non-profit groups.  Tea and goodies made by the EMCS Culinary Arts students will be available by donation and there will be gift baskets to be won filled with items donated by the vendors.  We will be screening 2 short but inspiring films “Nourish: Food and Community and “Cultivating Healthy Food and Gardens for a Sustainable Future”.  The beautiful visuals and inspiring stories in “Nourish” trace our relationship to food from a global perspective to personal action steps people have taken.  It features interviews with Anna Lappe, Michael Pollan, a chef, a pediatrician and several organic farmers. “Cultivating” is a quick world tour of innovative ways in which communities have focused on making food production, from field to plate, a local endeavor. The tour travels through Victoria to look at Lifecycles’ fruit tree gleaning project.

Doors open at 6:45; films at 7:45.  Evening will conclude at 9:00 as usual.

Don’t forget to bring some cash for buying those yummy early carrots and greens, seeds and local foodstuffs.

 

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Guantanamo’s Child: Omar Khadr March 9, 2016

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Omar Khadr is the Canadian youth who was captured by American Forces in Afghanistan and spent over a decade in Guantanamo Prison.  He was released on bail in Edmonton in May of 2015 at age 28.  Based on the book by award-winning journalist Michelle Shephard who co-directed the film with Patrick Reed, “Guantanamo’s Child” chronicles Khadr’s life from his family’s arrival in Afghanistan from Canada through his capture when he was 15 to his time in the infamous Guantanamo Prison where he underwent hundreds of hours of interrogation and “coercive techniques”.  The film probes Khadr’s case from every angle with interviews with soldiers, prison guards and prison mates.

In the words of the filmmakers:  “For more than a decade Omar Khadr has existed only as a caricature drawn and defined by others: victim, killer, child, detainee, political pawn, terrorist, pacifist.  We had a simple goal in making this documentary – we wanted to tell his story by allowing him to tell his story….It was not a simple film to make.”

“Guantanamo’s Child” was rated as one the ten best Canadian films of 2015 by Vancouver’s Cinematheque.  It acquaints us with an incredibly resilient young man who grew up in a tragic and mind-boggling situation and quietly portrays the triumph of the human spirit.

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Permaculture Evening February 10, 2016

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Featuring the film “Inhabit” and a panel of Sooke Permaculture maestros.

Released in 2015, “Inhabit” introduces permaculture, a design method that offers an ecological lens for solving many issues related to agriculture, economics, governance and more.  This film presents a vast array of projects, concepts and people and it translates the biodiversity of permaculture into something that can be understood by an equally diverse audience.

For those familiar it will be a call to action and a glimpse into what’s possible – projects and solutions already under way.  For those unfamiliar with permaculture it will be an introduction to a new way of being and a new way of relating to the Earth.  For everyone it will be a reminder that humans are capable of being planetary healing forces.

The post screening panel will enlighten moviegoers about permaculture projects in our neighborhood and answer questions from the audience.  The panel will feature Tony St. Pierre and Erin Newell from Cast Iron Farm, a collectively run permaculture farm that hosts a monthly Sooke permaculture gathering.

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